Sunday, December 19, 2010

senso-ji temple asakusa tokyo

a part of japan's traditions were contained in a place like Asakusa normally pronounced as "Asak-sa". being one of Tokyo's oldest district, it still holds the legend that has kept this place sacred.a story which happened about 1,382 years ago, where two brothers found a statue of the goddess of mercy along Sumida river, the river beside Asakusa. often times placed back but returns to them after some time.the temple was then built 17 years after and is still considered as the oldest temple in Tokyo. like most of the old structures in Tokyo, this was destroyed during the world war but was rebuilt as a symbol of rebirth.i was just on time to enter the temple not knowing that after few minutes it was already closing. it was surprising that in contrast with the temple size, there was not much to see inside as the area for tourists is limited. traditions are kept including one that caught my attention where people would approach this large wooden cabinet with small compartments that gives one its fortune. then after reading, it is then tied on a metal rod. a lot of young locals seemed to enjoy doing this.Asakusa's main shrine is often overlooked by tourists as the imposing Senso-ji temple stands beside it. this girl and her monkey entertains attracts tourists with some of their funny antics. they are not out of place as Asakusa still retains its old title being an entertainment district.how to get there:
most convenient way would be by train, just take any line that passes by Asakusa station.

location:
island: Honshu
region: Kanto
prefecture: Tokyo

escape factor:
historical background: 4.0
cultural value: 4.5
accessibility: 4.0
architectural design: 4.5
overall escape factor: 4.5

GPS location
35^ 42' 40" N
139^ 47' 47" E

16 comments:

eric said...

ganda ng temple!

gillboard said...

reminds me of an anime i've seen long ago. i love the last pic! :)

Luna Miranda said...

marvelous shots! i love your bokeh shot of the tied papers--what are those? the details inside and outside the temple are beautiful. thanks for sharing these photos.

princess_dyanie said...

buti nalang umabot ka! :D

Photo Cache said...

wonderful shots dong. your japan series is simply a sensory delight. gusto ko tuloy pumunta, sayang sobrang mahal lang.

docgelo said...

thank you for pointing out to your followers the proper pronunciation of asakusa. now i miss this place more. babalikan ko ang tokyo "bullet day!" (google translate : balang-araw!)

pusang kalye said...

iba ang feel nitong temple na to. I don't usually notice temples in japan with those dragon statues. or maybe I was just not paying close attention....

The Nomadic Pinoy said...

The way I look at it, parang Japanese version ng Chinese fortune cookie yung cabinet with multiple drawers.

Merry Christmas Dong!

Missy said...

I've been to Asakusa but I missed this temple maybe because I'm overwhelmed with too much temples already and didn't feel so much excitement on this. But your photos made me envy and I wish I tried to visit that during our stay there. How I wish ;-) thanks for sharing!

Bengbeng said...

i find this post fascinating.. they developed parallel to the Chinese mainland n occasionally there is overlap.. so there r similarities n differences in their culture

SandyCarlson said...

That look like an amazing place. These shots are just gorgeous.

alicesg said...

Wow the temple looked so huge and beautiful. I will have to take lots of memory card if I visit Japan. :)

nuts said...

now ko lang napansin temple sa japan.. thanks for this post!

Raft3r said...

sino yun mas makulit yun unggoy o yun tsiks?
hehe

merry christmas, dong!!!

Pietro said...

Amazing place. Beautiful sequence of images!

Reena said...

ang ganda ganda ng shots mo. nice that they have preserved some traditions even in the modern times. thanks a lot for sharing.

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